Monday, September 26, 2005

Still tense over here in Darfur - not surprising, considering the ongoing attacks on villages and humanitarian convoys, the fresh displacement across all three Darfur states and the high presence of military and rebel fighters in many towns.

Lots of people have the feeling something big is about the kick off. Nomads in the Al Malam area are still furious with the rebels for looting their camels and are threatening revenge (some people report that the new Janjaweed attacks on villages in North Darfur are already part of the retaliation).

Thousands of Arab camel herders are congregating around the Western edge of Kalma camp, where 150,000 highly politicised and angry IDPs are still living in overstuffed little shelters more than two years after they were first forced from their homes. In El Fasher, the capital of North Darfur, rumours are rife that the SLA rebels are infiltrating the town.

In a move to "instil renewed confidence in the general public", the Sudanese military has sent 2 tanks, 25 landcruisers and 18 trucks to patrol the streets of El Fasher. Somehow, I'm not so confident.

Sometimes it's just too easy to forget that the Government of Sudan, the SLA and the JEM have signed more than six binding agreements promising to put an end to all hostilities and respect a ceasefire in Darfur - or that people in the international community are supposed to be holding them to it.

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

1 Comments:

At , Blogger jsb said...

Hey Sleepless,
Terrific, finally someone in the fray writing like it truly is. And you are a hell of a writer. Write the book! I had to get out of humanitarian work before I could write about it (Where Soldiers Fear to Tread, At work in the fields of Anarchy, Heinemann, UK, Bantam/Dell, USA www.reliefworker.com) but the nightmares of violence, the inefficiency, the bungling, the absurdity and interference of local politics and the wretched suffering of the those we were trying to help, continues. I don't klnow who you are but having spent some time in Sudan, and Somalia, I can appreciate the frustrations. Love to shout you a cold medicinal ale when you come up for air. brgds, john (info@reliefworker.com)

 

Post a Comment

<< Home