Wednesday, August 10, 2005

Hard work and more bad connections are not leaving me much time to write, but then again my worries seem somewhat insignificant when I compare them to those of the people I work with.

Two years of living inside overfilled temporary camps seem to be taking their toll on the displaced communities - and tensions in Darfur are running high wherever I look.

Kalma camp has already seen several attempted lynchings and stonings over the past weeks, and all throughout the region groups of armed men have been disrupting camp head counts and food distributions, killing several people in the process.

It's almost impossible to establish exactly who and what is causing the problems; even the aid workers seem mostly confused. The divide and rule tactics that the Sudanese government has perfected are doing a great job in adding to this chaos: rumours are running wild, and there seems to be a concerted effort underway to pit sheiks, tribes, camps, even aid agencies against each other.

Places like Al Salam in South Darfur (the site that the government was hoping to move some 25,000 of Kalma camp's residents to) have turned into a new breed of 'political camps'.

Ignoring insistent pleas from the NGOs that the area is safe from neither violence nor seasonal floods, authorities have managed to get a few thousand people to move to this site (interestingly, the new arrivals have not moved from Kalma camp, but seem to be a random bunch of families who were transferred to Al Salam amid much confusion during a recent headcount at the nearby government-controlled Sherif camp)."It just seemed like a good opportunity for the government to dump a few confused people into a new site," a fellow aid worker remarks wrily of the headcount.

NGOs who have begun visiting the newly arrived families in Al Salam to assess the situation have been ceremoniously introduced to "the new sheiks of the camp", a group of suspiciously young men who seem to have trouble remembering the names of their original villages.

Truth in Darfur is becoming harder to find every day. The only thing most of us can agree on is that Darfur is still a mess - it just happens to be one that boils along quietly while the world is turning its back.

Tags: , , , , ,

2 Comments:

At , Blogger Ingrid said...

**Truth in Darfur is becoming harder to find every day. The only thing most of us can agree on is that Darfur is still a mess - it just happens to be one that boils along quietly while the world is turning its back.**

What a load of twaddle. Scroll through a year of my archives at Sudan Watch and see how the world has not been turning its back.

http://sudanwatch.blogspot.com

 
At , Blogger Ingrid said...

**Truth in Darfur is becoming harder to find every day. The only thing most of us can agree on is that Darfur is still a mess - it just happens to be one that boils along quietly while the world is turning its back.**

What a load of twaddle. Scroll through a year of my archives at Sudan Watch and see how the world has not been turning its back.

http://sudanwatch.blogspot.com

 

Post a Comment

<< Home